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This is one I have wanted to see for long time. With a stunning backdrop of the Cheviot Hills in Northumberland, this ancient stone circle sits upon a small hill like a crown on an old Kings head.

Duddo Stone Circle

It’s stones (there were originally 7, but now there are 5) are weather scarred with bizarre and grotesque markings – and locals say the wind blows through the cracks and makes a singing sound.

This is Duddo Stone Circle – and it is beautiful and very mysterious. No one knows why it is here, who built it and what it means. It is thought to have been built about 2000 BC and a fragment of bone which was recovered from the centre was dated to 1740-1660 BC, and this suggests that the use of the circle for burials was taking place at a later date. But, no one knows.

Duddo Stone Circle

On this day, Shirl and I walked up a farm track from little Duddo village – you can’t see the circle from the road – and followed a path along the side of some woods. Eventually we could see the circle sitting on top of the hill in the distance. Climbing the hill the circle was before us in the long grass.

Duddo Stone Circle

Just to be in the presence of so ancient a site was awesome. To touch and feel these old stones and feel the contours, the grain of the rock and power contained inside was humbling.

There are many stone circles in the U.K. (very few exist in other countries) and the famous ones like Stonehenge are guarded by million pound visitor centres. But the little ones, like this are just as important and as mysterious…and some how…personal.

Duddo Stone Circle

 

 

 

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